Mushrooms in Skincare - How Do They Work?

Mushrooms in Skincare - How Do They Work?


3 minute read

How do mushrooms work with the skin?

As exceptionally powerful adaptogenic ingredients, antioxidant-rich mushrooms are known to help mitigate the skin’s response to stress from environmental and internal stressors by identifying where an imbalance is and minimising the inflammation at the source. Environmental stress from pollution and UV sun rays expose the skin to free radicals which damage its structural proteins, this triggers inflammation and causes the skin to age prematurely by compromising its barrier function.

 

Reishi and Chaga mushrooms within our Mushroom Facial Cleansing Scrub, Mushroom Facial Serum and Mushroom Sheet Masks (3 pack) have adaptogenic properties. These mushrooms are known to regulate levels of the stress hormone cortisol and minimise inflammation. Their antioxidant capacity helps shield the skin from the drying and ageing effects of free radical damage, keeping the complexion young and healthy-looking for longer. 

One key way is that these mushrooms buffer the body’s stress response and working to support and nourish the adrenals and central nervous system. In skincare, mushrooms are rich in B complex vitamins, which can do everything from calm inflammation to brighten the skin. Containing omega fatty acids and ceramides that can help to build up the skin’s moisture barrier, preventing water loss and keeping hydration within the skin whilst assisting in distributing active ingredients to where they’re needed most, helping the skin look healthier overall.

Reference:

1.     Panossian A, Wikman G. Effects of Adaptogens on the Central Nervous System and the Molecular Mechanisms Associated with Their Stress-Protective Activity. Pharmaceuticals (Basel). 2010;3(1):188-224. Published 2010 Jan 19. doi:10.3390/ph3010188 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3991026/

2.     Kalaras, M. D., Richie, J., Calcagnotto, A., & Beelman, R. B. (2017). Mushrooms: A rich source of the antioxidants ergothioneine and glutathione. Food Chemistry, 233, 429-433.https://pennstate.pure.elsevier.com/en/publications/mushrooms-a-rich-source-of-the-antioxidants-ergothioneine-and-glu 

3.     Panossian A, Wikman G. Effects of Adaptogens on the Central Nervous System and the Molecular Mechanisms Associated with Their Stress-Protective Activity. Pharmaceuticals (Basel). 2010;3(1):188-224. Published 2010 Jan 19. doi:10.3390/ph3010188

4.     Mushrooms extracts and compounds in cosmetics, cosmeceuticals and nutricosmetics OludemiTaofiqabAna M.González-ParamásaAnabelaMartinsaMaria FilomenaBarreirocIsabel C.F.R.Ferreira https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S092666901630396X#

5.     Vetvicka V, Vannucci L, Sima P, Richter J. Beta Glucan: Supplement or Drug? From Laboratory to Clinical Trials. Molecules. 2019;24(7):1251. Published 2019 Mar 30. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6479769/

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